GermanWineEstates - The Site for German Wine Lovers

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This website is devoted to a selection of fine wine estates from Germany, whose wines are available in the United States through wine importer and distributor, Slocum & Sons, located in North Haven, Connecticut. This portfolio has been created by Eric Litchfield, the company's Import Sales Director, who has spent considerable time selecting producers that define today's highest standards of wine making. Mr. Litchfield's philosophy is allowing the wine producer and nature to harmonize equally, utilizing sustainable agriculture, organic and biodynamic farming to reach the purest expression of grape varietal, microclimate and terroir, yielding wines of supreme balance and elegance.

It is the objective of this website to provide comprehensive data about these fine wine estates as well as other aspects of the German wine industry, including: current news, understanding German wine labels, wine region information and vintage reports. It is our goal to make GermanWineEstates, information and vintage reports. It is our goal to make GermanWineEstates, The Site for German Wine Lovers.
Wine Estate of the Month
Tidbits of Information


Dr. Crusius

We are very lucky.  For over 400 years the family Crusius lives in one of the finest wine regions of Germany - the middle Nahe.  Near the landscape is here considerably harsher and more diverse, the river meanders still in their original bed, the mighty Red rock massif marks the spectacular centerpiece of the region.  This unique landscape is what drives us to make wines that show the origin and inspire.  We are guided by three principles to achieve this goal.

1) Excellent location portfolio. We are convinced that the best and most typical wines can arise only in large documents.  Therefore, we strive to always know better our top locations and expand their share of the total.  Our vineyards are located in the immediate vicinity of the winery (no vineyard is further away than 8km).  70% of our vineyard area are classified "first principles" bring to the position of the Statute VDP Nahe and therefore entitled, "Large Family".

2) Unique wine expertise. We are convinced that a solid professional training and years of experience in the wine tasting and -make help us to make the right decisions in the vineyard and cellar.

Whether intense, close-knit young wine tasting during the stage of vertical samples of various vintages and tasting of wines from colleagues, we always taste the team and for several days.  Ultimately flow more than 130 years of cumulative experience in winemaking.  Peter Crusius belongs to a very small circle of German wine growers, the scientific further pursued even after graduation in Geisenheim, the quality question.  Parallel to the work in the domestic winery, he wrote an empirical work on the "impact of pruning on the quality of wine".  The investigated methods are now standard. The continued close contact with the Geisenheim Research practice helps us a lot.

3) Professional and transparent work. We believe that professionalism and openness in the daily work leads to better wines and helps us to inspire with Origin.  Meticulously we take in the vineyard on the health of the vines.  We read manually and with a few, very experienced reading helpers.  Most have already introduced more than 15 crops.  In the basement we work a maximum of gentle and flexible.  Spontaneous fermentation and yeasts are not a dogmatic contrast with us.  Depending on the vintage and packaging conditions, we make use of both methods.

Similarly, pragmatically we use old wooden barrels and stainless steel tanks for aging.  For all methods, we create every year consciously room for experimentation and continuous forcing us to break rules.  The cultivation of Auxerrois and Riesling Cuvée Top-of-the-rock are two successful examples of such experiments.

"Our wines are intended to show the origin and inspire."
What You Need to Know About German Riesling
Get the lowdown on the versatile wine world darling. 
Written by Anne Krebiehl, Wine Enthusiast Magazine
-1 August 2015-

It’s about that time to swap your go-to summer rosé with your favorite Riesling, as July’s month-long “31 Days of German Riesling” is upon us.

This year’s celebration is a step up from the “Summer of Riesling” which restaurateur and sommelier Paul Grieco launched seven years ago to honor one of the great Vitis vinifera grapes.

More than 100 restaurants and wine shops across the country will participate, offering selected German Rieslings by the glass. It’s a deliciously diverse grape, so there’s a style for everyone’s palate.

Here’s the lowdown on this cool, crisp wine.

1. First of all, it’s pronounced REE-sling.

2. It’s a diverse variety. It grows in each of Germany’s 13 growing regions. It can thrive in different climatic conditions, from cold and cool to warm. Riesling ripens on many soils, including slate, mica schist, granite, fossil limestone, quartzite, rhyolite and sandstone.

3. Germany’s Mosel region, famous for its crisp, citrus-centric Riesling, dedicates a whopping 60% of plantings to the variety.

4. Riesling’s hallmark is its acidity. It’s what provides the structure and longevity that allows them to age so well.

5. It has major range. Rieslings can be dry, off dry, semisweet or lusciously sweet (those made from botrytised or frozen grapes).

6. Speaking of dry—some drinkers assume all Rieslings are sweet, but there are many bone dry options, too. These are especially interesting because they are perfectly balanced by high acid, which gives them great body.

7. If you love dry Riesling, look for the word trocken on the label. This means “dry,” and the wines have alcohol levels of 11% and above. If you’re more into off-dry styles, look for the word feinherb on the label. This has some residual sugar and a dry finish. And if you love medium-sweet styles? Go for halbtrocken or lieblich, which have alcohol levels between 9–10.5%.

8. Anything below 9% alcohol by volume tends to be is sweet. But remember, there’s still acid in these babies to keep the balance.

9. Make sure to stop and smell the Riesling—its aroma spectrum is mind-blowing. The lightest Rieslings smell like a summer-night stroll through a jasmine and orange grove. Others are explosions of lemon and lime, pink and yellow grapefruit, orange and tangerine. Riper styles prompt visions of juicy peaches, yellow plums or apricots, with swirling clouds of mango and pineapple.

10. Riesling gets better with age. So when ordering your next pour, choose a mature vintage. You’ll sniff honey, honeysuckle, candied peel and super-charged peach. The palate will feel like balm. Think I’m kidding? Order a 20-year-old.

AustrianWineEstates
Tidbits of Information Archive


AustrianWineEstates is a website devoted to a selection of fine wine estates from Austria, whose wines are available in the United States through wine importer and distributor, Slocum & Sons, located in North Haven, Connecticut. This portfolio has been created by Eric Litchfield, the company's Import Sales Director, who has spent considerable time selecting producers that define today's highest standards of wine making. Mr. Litchfield's philosophy is to allow the wine producer and nature to harmonize equally, utilizing sustainable agriculture, organic and biodynamic farming to reach the purest expression of grape varietal, microclimate and terroir, yielding wines of supreme balance and elegance.
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